What I Learned on my Radiology Rotation

1. Radiologists are, on average, pretty chill, happy people. They also, on average, swear a lot, which relaxes me and frees up the 25% of my mental effort that usually goes toward not dropping F-bombs, for learning.

2. Most kinds of images are not taken by radiologists themselves, they’re done by radiology technicians. I already knew that, but I’d never thought about it before. An experienced and knowledgeable tech makes all the difference in the world. Incidentally it takes them a buttload of time to train, and they’re highly specialized to the kind of images they take. Most of the techs I asked said that good communication with the doctors was everything. Also they would like the doctors to appreciate that some pictures are just really hard to take, and that they are doing their best.

3. Imaging is a consultation, not an order. The x-ray doesn’t spit out an answer; what you get is another doctor’s assessment of the patient’s condition.

4. Therefore, radiologists really, really, really, really, really, want clinicians to provide a clinical history when they order imaging. What they are looking for and how they interpret what they find are both influenced by the patient’s story. You know, like, everything else in medicine. And no, they can’t look it up in the patient’s chart. Another med student on this rotation with me ran the numbers and figured out that if the radiologists at UW took two minutes for each patient to look into their charts, it would add 7 hours to their day.

5. MRA can stand for Magnetic Resonance Angiography. I now plan to imagine the uglier corners of the internet as arteries.

MRA-Kidneys

6. The experience that trained me the best for reading images is taking Art Humanities in college. In case you were looking for another reason why premeds should get a liberal arts education.

7. ALARA, as you may know, stands for As Low as Reasonably Achievable, and it is the principle that guides exposure to radiation from medical imaging (and other things). I checked, and the number of US babies named Alara is on the rise. How many of their parents are radiologists, and how many are teenagers that are into Magic the Gathering? We’ll never know.

AlaraBabies

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